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Recap: At Nationals, the higher grip levels revealed a problem with lifting the inside rear tire and locking up the rear tires. I determined that this was due to the left rear tire having 90 lbs less

I don't think an STI motor would fit. They're really wide, there's a couple inches on each side of the valve covers to the main frame rails. And I can confirm that an STI motor is too much. Did I

As far as I could tell, the car is ready for it's racing debut. Loading it into my trailer for the dyno was a huge problem so I sold that trailer and bought another one that has a 9" lower load height

Update: I have a set of ProComp aluminum heads, Comp Cams steel roller rockers and XE282HR grind roller cam on the way (thanks Phil at www.fasttoys.net). The heads have 2.02/1.6 valves, bigger ports and are 42 lbs less than my iron heads. The cam is pretty wild with .565 in/.574 ex lift, 280 in/292 ex duration. I have no idea what power this combo will make but It should be significantly higher than what I have now. I have been searching Ford forums for what others with these parts have made on the dyno or on the dragstrip and based on that, I am hoping for 275-300 hp at the wheels.

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Hm' date=' that cam is recommended quite often (at the corral at least) for 351W based strokers as an alternative to a custom ground cam. Whatcha got planned for an intake?[/quote']It's typically used in 347 stroker motors for the street because the extra cubic inches still provide torque and the cam flows a lot of air for top end. It will work great in my 306 CID race engine because the power band will be moved up where I want it. Currently I am using a GT40 intake with a 70mm tb and 75mm maf.
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  • 2 weeks later...

I have been working on the car but it's been a zoo at the track with a roof that is leaking, staff being let go, karts dripping brake fluid all over the place and changing the direction of the track. So, Briget cleaned and painted the new engine (Panther Pink, of course), I have installed the cam, cam drive, oil pick up and pan. The old engine is out of the car and I am stripping off what I need for the new one. Here's a pic of the mayhem that is my work space:Posted Image

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  • 2 weeks later...

I changed the suspension bushings and balljoints. The shafts holding the lower control arms have been there since 1968 so they needed some rather unfriendly persuasion. The old rubber bushingsPosted ImageAnd the new ones:Posted ImageCheck out the old school ball joint on the right, with shims for adjusting.Posted Image

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The GT40 intake manifold I have is an improvement over the stock Mustang intake but doesn't flow as well as the aftermarket intakes. That is, unless it's ported and then it makes just as much power as a good aftermarket intake. There is a fella in Texas who has spent a good deal of time figuring out how to port the GT40 and has a whole write up on it, found here: http://www.eectuning.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=14018I followed these steps for my own intake and hope to get it on a dyno soon to confirm results. Here are some before and after pics:Posted ImagePosted ImageI had to open up the intake gasket just to match the head and intake ports.

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With the new heads, I had to recheck pushrod length to avoid premature valve failure. I did this by disassembling a lifter and putting washers inside it to simulate a fully pumped up lifter. I also cut a stock pushrod in half, threaded the inside of it and added a 6mm threaded rod so it was adjustable for length. Then I took a sharpie to the top of the valve stem and installed the roller tipped rockers as per the Comp Cams directions. After spinning the engine over two full rotations, a line was formed in the sharpie ink across the top of the valve stem. By adjusting the pushrod length, I could change where the line formed on the valve stem and once it was right across the middle of the stem, I measured the pushrod and ordered more just like it. Once they arrived, I installed all the rocker arms and here is a picture:Posted Image

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I thought I saw a light at the end of the tunnel but it turned out to be a train coming right at me. I was bolting the upper intake manifold on and the book calls for 34 Nm torque. My 3/8" clicker torque wrench has the gradients etched into the shaft (10,20,30, etc) and smaller gradients (1,2,3 etc) in the part that twists around. The top gradient in the shaft is 29 Nm so I turned the handle up to that, then added 5 more to get 34 Nm, the recommended torque. The wrench definitely clicked but then I felt a different sort of click, the pictures explain the rest.Posted ImagePosted Image

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is an awesome build. Very inspiring! Wish I could see this in person. I take it there is shop at speedworld where you are building this?

I have an area where I repair karts and have carved out a little space for the race car. It was a lot easier when I had an assistant manager who did all the kart maintenance on Mondays and worked 5:00-midnight monday to thursday. I could work on the car 10:00-noon then run races all afternoon. But now that I do all the maintenance and repairs, I am fixing karts from 10:00 to noon then run races until 11:00 or 12:00 at night, leaving little time for race car work.
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Well thats real unfortunate. I live across the city in Transcona so it would be a long drive each day for me to come out to Speedworld. I've considered the position you have open but I've never really come and talked to you or anything. I'm a certified Automotive Technician and it would be awesome to work on carts each day and be able to race them as well. The next time I come out to Speedworld I should come and say "hi" and possibly check out the race car!

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I checked over all the bolts to make sure they were tight and I replaced some with shorter ones to save a few ounces. I also zip tied any loose wires and hoses while I was in there. Since I do not have an air filter, I added a fine aluminum mesh to the opening of the air box to catch anything big enough to cause damage.Posted ImageMy old alternator tensioner was actually attached to the frame because I had solid engine mounts, but I was worried that if there were any flex in the mounts or frame, my belt would loosen and slip off. So I built a new tensioner that is all attached to the engine:Posted ImageAnd bolted the fenders, spoiler and grille on, so I am essentially good to go.Posted Image

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I need to test everything I can before the first event so I backed the car up to the acid etched part of the kart track, revved it to 3000 rpm and dumped the clutch. I did this four times in a row and everything felt great and nothing broke. It also launches HARD. This new T5 trans grinds going into reverse but I discovered later that many T5's do this and the cure is to shift into 5th before going into reverse. And FYI I am running the recommended trans fluid in it and the clutch is adjusted properly. Here's videos from different angles of the launches, check out the sparks coming off the tires, it's from metal shavings stuck in the slicks:

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...revved it to 3000 rpm and dumped the clutch...

That's a great way to stall an S2000. ;) I have a feeling those pesky red cars won't be taking any FTDs from now on... I hope I'm wrong, but I don't think so. Cool stuff Mark!
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