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Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/15/2013 in Images

  1. WSCC, Gimli Motorsports Park, 1969 Lotus Type 61M Formula Ford, driver Bill Hilash, with Red Racer Ron Lyseng, Monique Hilash, Werner Hohler and Sally Iwanchuck looking at the car.
    3 points
  2. From the George Chapman collection
    2 points
  3. LYSENG #14 - PORSCHE 911 red white and blue stars and stripes for never! This is what my yellow 911S looked like when I bought it in 1974. It had previously been owned and run by Michael Keyser Toad Hall Racing. He had run it in the Daytona 24 hour, Sebring 12 hour and Tallegada 24 hour races plus a bunch of shorter IMSA races. By coincidence, I closely examined the car at an IMSA race at DonnyBrook in 1972. On the warmup grid there was a straight line of 2-litre 911s in all sorts of colours. Probably 10 or 15 of them gunning their engines. Big flares over the 9” wide rear rims. A long row of cats waiting to spring. I fell in love. I had to have such a car. As things worked, I inadvertently bought one of the cars I saw in Minnesota two years earlier. When I sandblasted it all down to bare metal, I discovered I had bought the purple one. It grew the stars and stripes two coats of paint later. I could just push that car and push it some more and abuse it and drive the crap out of it, and it only let me down once, and that was my fault when building an engine. After ten years, it turned out to be very cheap racing. I won second place at the CASC Runoffs at Mt. Tremblant in 1976. I was reeling in the first place car, but needed two more laps. Damn!
    2 points
  4. LYSENG #10 - Porsche 356. In 1969 I needed one more signature in my logbook to get my National license, but my MGA had failed me too often to merit another go. So I put a rollbar in my street car and hauled it up to McDonald. This is back in the days when we could by a 90hp Porsche like this with the Carerra knock-off wheels for $1,000. This was my second Porsche. I bought my first one while in 11th grade for $500. It was a 70hp Normal engine. Pictured here with Phyllis Lyseng.
    2 points
  5. KIKI in it’s original colours as Hugh Hanson bought it. The sight of this car always scares me. If it ever hit anything, I suspect it would split asunder right at the skinny weak spot where the driver sits. The heavy motor block would go one direction, the rear end another direction, and the driver? Who knows where. It needs a good cage to tie the front end to the rear end. Just my opinion, that’s all.
    2 points
  6. Manitoba Motorsports Hall of Fame
    2 points
  7. From the George Chapman collection
    1 point
  8. WSCC HILL CLIMB AT MORDEN, MANITOBA August 1960
    1 point
  9. WSCC HILL CLIMB AT MORDEN, MANITOBA August 1960 Al Ducharme & his 1959 Chev 2dr. which had the 348 cu.in engine with triple carbs & 4spd transmission. Al was a member of the WSCC as I recall, so he may have been instrumental in having the Roadster Club join in a WSCC event.
    1 point
  10. Jennifer Bell Winnipeg Sports Car Club 2018 Annual Banquet Photo by Jodi Bolger
    1 point
  11. Winnipeg Sports Car Club Ice Racing Winnipeg, Portage la Prairie and Gimli, Manitoba, Canada
    1 point
  12. 1973 Winnipeg Sports Car Club (WSCC) Ice Race, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, on the Red River south of the city. Wayne Bergstresser and his father drove out to this event on a Sunday afternoon in the spring of 1973. This was Wayne's first Winnipeg Sports Car Club event and thirteen years later he road raced with the club in a Datsun 510 purchased from Jackson Autosport. Wayne Bergstresser 1986 Rookie of the Year 1987 Club Champion 1987 GT2 Champion
    1 point
  13. Short film of the Winnipeg Sports Car Club Summer Races in 1967 at the MacDonald Airport in MacDonald, Manitoba
    1 point
  14. Winnipeg Sports Car Club, 1967, closed and open wheel racing at Southport Airport, Southport, Manitoba, Canada
    1 point
  15. Short film of the Winnipeg Sports Car Club at the Gimli Motorsports Park in the mid-1970's
    1 point
  16. Gilles Villeneuve feature from the day after he died in 1982. A sequence of Gilles racing at Gimli Motorsports Park in the 1975 Formula Atlantic Series is just after the 6 minute mark.
    1 point
  17. Run-offs at Gimli, 1974, Oct 4, 5th. My history group came through with the driver names. Archive photo credit to John Porter. Car 6 - Bob Beyea Left car 112? - Graham Cameron Right car 66 - Roddy Bremmer
    1 point
  18. LYSENG #13 PORSCHE 911 WHY YELLOW??? The attached Free Press story tells only part of the reason. Military researchers had been delving into color recognition many years before WWII. I first read about it in the 1960’s while in university. Apparently it has to do with evolution. In pre-historic time, the ol’ Human Racers evolved without much YELLOW in their world, thus the cones learned to react quickly whenever they saw an odd color like yellow. Have you noticed how fire engines and ambulances now have mixtures of yellow, orange and white. That’s why. So for my racers, yellow is better at keeping me out of incidents. And, if someone DOES tap me, it’ll be hard for him to say he didn’t see me. Black cars, even Red cars very hard to see. And the many many shades of Grey. Now, put this piece of safety knowledge to use and try to buy a safe yellow vehicle for the street. Good luck. Manufacturers don’t like the color. It’s especially hypocritical that the European car companies who flaunt their safety technology do not offer yellow: Mercedes, BMW, Volvo, Porsche, VW. Hypocrisy or what!!
    1 point
  19. LYSENG #12 - Porsche 2-litre 911S out braking #15 deep into Corner One. Regardless of what class I raced, I've never been able to afford the kind of engine that let me win on the basis of sheer horsepower. The only three options were A-develop a better brake system, B-make the car handle better and C-learn to drive better. There are those folks who say option C was beyond me. Maybe so. That’s OK, because what I really liked best anyway was deeking guys out going into the corners. It’s called intimidation. I always spent a lot of time developing better braking systems. On the 911, with all that weight hanging out the ass end, forward weight transfer during braking was a major asset. I copied the adjustable twin master cylinder system I saw on factory Carerras, with the help of Pat Barry. By the second year, I could out-brake every car on the track except for the ultra-light sports racers of Reski and Needham. I loved Corners One, Three and Eight. Unfortunately, Corner Eight is no longer a drivers corner. It’s now a parade corner. The new car I’m just finishing is powered by a 700cc two-stroke engine. I doubt it will beat anybody on the basis of power. But it has Wildwood 4-pot discs at the front and inboard Wildwood brakes at the rear. I hope it does well in Corners One and Three. At least that’s my plan.
    1 point
  20. LYSENG #11 - RABBIT ICE RACER 1990 Sioux Narrows “WORLD (as we know it) CUP”. Looks like poo-poo but it was an engineering marvel. Wheelbase lengthened 2 inches to make it easier to dive deep into corners and then set it sideways. Copied from the Lindorfer system on Tom Jones Rabbit. Adjustable twin master cylinders with major bias to the rear discs instead of using handbrake. When it went according to plan, the idea was to pass people on the inside going into a corner, then tap the brake while staying on full throttle to turn the car into the apex, then go “rocketing” down the next straight, all the while laughing “Yippee!" Inboard front disc brake - don’t know if subsequent owners ever completed that system. Wing allowed me to catch and pass the six-tired Mini from Stonewall in the faster corners. Long-stroke 1700cc gave good low-end torque pulling out of corners.
    1 point
  21. Why is veteran race car driver Mo Carter facing the wrong way in the last corner of the last lap of the 198??? CASC Championship race at Gimli? Because he deserves it, that’s why. Earlier in the race, he and Jacque Bienvenue with his Porsche Carrera had been battling and bumping for the lead. One of the greatest races ever anywhere. Sheer violence. Finally, Carter bumped the white Porsche off the track at Corner Two. Now that’s taking it too far. Bienvenue was prairie-bound for a while and that made him crazy. Back on the track, he drove like a man possessed trying to catch the red Camaro. He caught Mo in Corner Eight on the last lap. He put the nose of the Porsche under the high raised rear end of the Camaro and just stayed on the throttle a new nano seconds. Enough to spin Carter. You can almost see the smile of Bienvenue’s face in the background. I understand there was a punching match in the paddock later, but I can’t confirm that. Too bad we don’t allow that kind of all-out racing anymore. Much more sanitary to turn our sport into a slalom parade of cars that have to keep their distance from each other, lest they get flagged in. Kind of like a solo event. I guess it works. Kind of like having solo sex, never touching. There’s still some minor element of excitement I suppose. Some minor element of satisfaction. Personally, I prefer the old fashioned way with 20 or 30 sweaty, testosterone-charged up guys, and maybe a girl or two in the fray, all bumping and clamouring, trying to get into Corner One first.
    1 point
  22. LYSENG FIRST RACE CAR- MGA purchased new I believe by Grame Lowden, who wrapped it around a tree in the Shell 2000 cross-Canada rally. Pat Barry bought it and raced it at McDonald airport track north of Portage in 1967, the first time I every saw a sportscar race. I digress. I graduated from Fargo North High School (Fargo North Dakota) the third week of May 1967. I had heard about these sportswear races up in Canada, so at 5:00am on graduation Saturday morning I commenced to hitch hike up to Winnipeg, then out to MacDonald. Got there in time to help haul hay bales to “build the track”. What I saw that weekend just blew up my mind all to pieces. This was 100 times better than anything I had imagined. I just had to do this. I still feel that crazed about racing now sometimes half a century later. That’s why, at age 67, I’m building another car. Only this time I’ve built a car almost from scratch. I worked for Jon Reski for two years while finishing university in Moorhead. I had enormous admiration for his work. So I told myself that if Jon can create race cars from scratch, then so can I. Well, my work is so inferior to his it’s a shame, but I done it, and that’s what matters to me. Hope Jon’s looking down on my project. Hey Jon, this one’s for you!!
    1 point
  23. Frank Mancini, a founding member of the Winnipeg Sports Car Club, induction into the Manitoba Motorsports Hall of Fame (George Chapman in the background), March 25, 2017. Manitoba Motorsports Hall of Fame
    1 point
  24. 1978 Gimli Motorsport Park Formula Ford Pit Crew for Bill Hilash, L to R: Jim Cushon, Ken Hilash, Jim Hilash, Leon Feinstein
    1 point
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