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Weebly

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Everything posted by Weebly

  1. Don't worry about the brake fluid thread ... it was giving me a headache. I'm learning s-o-o-o much from you guys. Keep it coming!
  2. @donrolandofuriosoThis just in from Wikipedia: "GL-5 is not necessarily backward-compatible in synchro-mesh transmissions which are designed for a GL-4 oil: GL-5 has a lower coefficient of friction due to the higher concentration of EP additives over GL-4, and thus synchros can not engage as effectively." Hope it's not too late to drain and refill with Redline MT90 (which meets API class GL-4).
  3. Hey everyone, time for an update. The conditions were cloudy and cool on the Saturday of Vintage weekend, but I still lost brakes during the third session. I bled the suspect RH caliper and got back most of my braking. Managed to complete fourth session but pedal travel was increasing. Just to be safe I did a four-wheel bleed before heading home. I tried to do an automated ABS bleed procedure with my newly purchased Autel MaxiCheck Pro but was informed by their tech support that it won’t work on my car. Too bad, so sad. RH brake caliper has been ordered and I’m presently sourcing out stainless steel brake hoses. The RBF660 brake fluid has been in my system for 6 weeks, so that will have to be flushed. How often do you guys do a complete flush on the Fuchs 5.1 and the Total 600? I might just consider going back to DOT 4 now that I’ve convinced myself that I don’t have a boiling brake fluid issue.
  4. @white_cross looks like @Rare Snake has raised the bar a notch or two. I watched Dason's runs on Saturday and I don't think "charming" this snake with a flute will work. You'll need to bring a big club to this snake fight. I always cheer for the underdog and I can't wait to see the completion of project "Snake Charmer"
  5. Okay, that's just plain crazy. And here I thought you're supposed to rest your clutch foot on the dead pedal while going down the front straight and take some deep breaths and relax before hitting the brakes for corner one. This is the one part of the lap that I find relaxing. The idea of pumping the brakes with my clutch foot and hoping that I will actually have brakes as I reach the braking markers takes away my relaxation moment and changes it to anxiety. Not sure this is in compliance with my doctor's advice when he said … " you should avoid stress". Cool video clip, though. Thanks.
  6. Actually, the RS uses the rear drive unit clutch plates to transfer more torque to the outside wheel, rather than using the more common brake application method. As far as the front brakes being used for torque vectoring, I don't think that's part of the process, so I wouldn't think that is adding any heat to the brakes. Just curious whether the sponginess you experienced at the track stayed the same after several days of city driving. Strangely enough, my pedal would become firm again after driving three days or so. I guess your original question about whether you need to bleed the brakes after every event, even with RBF 600, is "probably". If I come up with a fix, I'll certainly let you know.
  7. Wow!! You brought up some really good points @donrolandofurioso. I think you hit on a couple of points that might be contributing to my problems. In my last post I said I would update and report on the results of using Motul RBF 660 brake fluid. The afternoon temperatures on Saturday (Event #3) reached 30°C so it was a good day to test for high brake temperatures. However, the same pattern repeated itself … great brakes until the last session of the day. Only this time, a LOT of air got into the system and I had to bail out (pedal went 90% to the floor). Got home and gravity bled right front only. Didn't notice any air coming out of outboard pistons but got a lot of air coming out of inboard pistons. Brake pedal feel came back to almost normal. I'm leaning toward air being drawn into the system (fittings? brake hose?) or maybe migrating from the ABS module. I have a hard time believing that the fresh 660 brake fluid was actually boiling. I didn't feel confident returning to the track on Sunday and have the same problem reoccur, so I called it a day. I like your theory about air hiding inside the ABS unit and just waiting to spring out when the ABS cycles and then do their evil deed. I don't recall, one way or the other, whether I triggered an ABS event on my last session, but it's certainly possible. I went down to Vickar Ford and tried to get an explanation on how they flush the system while cycling the ABS module. Apparently it's a time consuming process where they suction out the old fluid, and then pressure-fill and bleed while activating the ABS system. Something like >$350. My car's in the body shop this week after being rear-ended (obviously not due to me stopping short), so I won't take any action until next week. Probably try one more flush procedure before spending $300 -$400 at the dealership. Thanks again for the great input!
  8. Once again, great job on the current newsletter! Nicely put together. I enjoyed Greg’s article on the 1965 Shelby Daytona. Good to hear that he was able to track it and do well at Mosport.
  9. Thanks for your suggestions guys. I'm going to try one thing at a time and see what difference it makes. The first step I've taken is to flush out all the existing DOT 4 and replace with Motul RBF 660. I used about 750 ml in the process, watching the volume in the catch bottle to ensure the longest line pumped through the most fluid and subsequently pushing through less and less as the lines got shorter. And Matt, you're right, that stuff is ridiculously expensive at almost $100/litre. But, if I get a soft pedal again, I know it won't be because of brake fluid boiling. This highly expensive, highly hygroscopic (absorbs moisture like a sponge) fluid, will therefore need to be flushed out at the end of the season and replaced with DOT 4 until the 2020 season begins. Then repeat the flush/fill process.. I think RBF 660 is probably overkill and might look into Stoptech 600 or something more reasonably priced. If you read through the suggestions in this thread, there seems to be a consensus that boiling shouldn't be happening with a DOT 4 fluid with a dry boiling point of 509°F. So maybe the suggestion of rubber line swelling is the answer. However, the one thing that supports the boiling theory is that that every time this happens (once last year, twice this year) it's never on a cool day or early in the run. It's always been at the end of the day. In other words, it takes several heat cycles to raise the temperature to the boiling point (and it's probably happening only on the front calipers. Front calipers also getting heat soaked by the engine. The PTU on my car is water-cooled (for good reason), and it gets hot as heck on that side of the car when you're in the pits following a run. Maybe I'm boiling fluid on the passenger side inboard pistons only? Another interesting point is that after city driving the car for three days following the event, the brake pedal becomes firm again. Almost like the air bubbles are finding their way back to the reservoir. Not sure how easy it would be for air bubbles to work their way back through the ABS modulator lines and eventually to the reservoir. The other theory is that the tiny air bubbles actually get re-absorbed back into the fluid over a period of time. However, the downside is that this apparently changes the chemistry of the fluid and will lower its boiling point. Not my theory, just something I read on the Internet. Anyways, I'll wait and see what happens at the next Time Attack event this month and report back before I make any further changes.
  10. Hey @nopistons those are great recommendations ... I really appreciate you taking the time to share your experience with people like me, who are just getting into the sport. I'll start by answering your questions: I'm on my second set of OEM pads with 2nd set of OEM front rotors (one set of rotors worn, other set had a cracked rotor). Hmm, not warming up the brakes during the warmup lap?? My braking application is definitely progressive (to the point of ... "geez, maybe I should be braking later and harder"). The Focus has ducting running up into the wheel well and deflectors from that point directing air toward the caliper. Ducting is open. Good point on the ABS pump and control unit. I've assumed all the internal passages are open when bleeding the brakes with ignition OFF. The Focus Service Manual does not mention anything about cycling the ABS unit, but I will research further. They do, however, recommend the use of DOT 4 or better. Moisture absorption with RBF 600/660 is not a big issue because I will flush system at least once/year. As a last point, sometimes these problems are self-inflicted. Ford built this car knowing that it would be tracked and went so far as to say that it's performance would not fall off after 30 laps. So, I shouldn't be having these problems after only five sessions. I guess that leaves improper bleeding/flushing technique as a possible contributor to my spongy pedal. Here's the procedure I use: Place a board under the brake pedal to ensure the master cylinder piston doesn't "overstroke". Next, start bleeding at longest line (RR) and work to closest (LF). I open the bleeder, then have my unwilling assistant smoothly press the pedal to the floor and hold. Bleeder screw is then closed and the pedal released. I repeat the process (5-6) times until I see enough fluid in the catch bottle to indicate no air bubbles and that the entire line has been flushed. I never" just" bleed, because I've assumed that if the fluid has boiled, it has degraded and should be flushed. In years past I've used the "pump the pedal several times and hold" before opening the bleeder valve. Don't really know if there's any advantage in that method. Anyways, if you or anyone else sees any issues in the way I'm doing the bleeding/flushing process, please let me know. Thanks everyone for your help!
  11. The first time I noticed the brake pedal drop following a Time Attack session last year, I assumed it was simply some moisture boiling off from the nearly two-year-old brake fluid. I looked for a DOT-4 brake fluid with a high dry boiling point that wasn’t overly expensive. Seemed too good to be true, but Kleen-Flo had a 509°F (265°C) boiling, was dirt cheap, and available at Piston Ring and elsewhere. I bled and flushed the system, and all was good. But, like I said, too good to be true. Following the first Time Attack event of 2019, back to a soft pedal. This time I spared no brake fluid and made sure the system was completely bled and flushed. I assumed the previous bleeding/flushing may not have been completely thorough. Just finished yesterday’s Time Attack and back to a soft pedal. Mind you, this time it took 10 sessions before I noticed the pedal drop. I checked the Kleen-Flo specifications on their website and they state a dry boiling point of only 475°F (246°C). I double-checked the specifications printed on the bottle to make sure I wasn’t seeing things. Makes we wonder if there are different standards for testing brake fluid. What is the consensus for the type of brake fluid that should be used for a 3500 lb car going 175 kph down the front straight? Do I really need a something over 600°F? and if so, would Motul RBF 660 be a good choice with a dry boiling point of 616°F (324°C)?
  12. I noticed that you didn't include the Focus RS on your list. I've driven mine two years and can confirm it was built for a driver that loves hooning. I think it would be a good fit for your driving style.
  13. Yeah, it looks like these are popular tires with a good price. Joose mentioned $148 CDN from a Quebec distributor, PCM tires. He was quoting 245's. Did you get a chance to read Magner's post in this thread? "Disappointing wear characteristics" is scaring me away. Otherwise a very good tire choice. Not sure if there's much difference between your Subaru and my Focus RS with respect to how they might eat up the Nexens. I'm going to order my next set of tires early next week and will probably go with the Hankook R-SR from PCM tire. Anyways, let's get together mid-season and we'll see how our tires compare.
  14. Wow - excellent price! I'd go for these if it weren't for the fact that Chris mentioned "disappointing wear characteristics". But, with a lighter car than my RS and smoother driving technique, this might be a tire to challenge the RE-71R. Please keep us updated through the season as to how they perform. I'm sure by end of July I'll need to order a second set of tires and will give these a try if the wear rate is decent. Thanks Joose!
  15. If anyone from the club is going out this week or next, let me know and I'll try and hook up.
  16. Hey everyone, Thanks for posting your comments and recommendations … very much appreciated and I think this will go a long way in helping people who might not have a lot of experience or a lot of money to throw away on experimenting with different tire choices. Well, at least that's how I was going to respond before I read Chris' reply. So my response has changed to: AWESOME!!! We can't thank you enough Chris for your contribution. I don't know how you found the time to put this all together and present it in a way that is based on fact and real-world experience without any bias or hyperbole. Your in-depth knowledge on this subject just blows me away. I would love to go on and on but I don't want to embarrass you. But maybe I already have. Thanks, bud!
  17. You and I are on the same page. No point paying top dollar for a sticky tire if the car isn't competitive. Actually, in my case, it's the driver that's not competitive. The RT615K's didn't get a high score (7.1) for tread wear in the Tire Rack test, but had good dry traction (9.0). Price seems right. Did you consider the Falken FK510's with 300 UTQG? And the price is even better. However, no test results from Tire Rack at this time. Like I told Peter, I'll add this to my database so that we can gather some informed opinions as to what works best for Autoslalom and what works best for Time Attack. Thanks!
  18. Sounds like a reasonable choice. I did a little research and they are 200 UTQG with a reasonable price. I'll add these to my growing database of recommended tires. Thanks!
  19. Thanks Joe - the rebates are timely with the Bridgestone offer valid until May 12th and the Continental offer valid until May 31st. These tire choices should work well for anyone attending HPDE and wondering what set of tires would work well for both Time Attack and Autoslalom. However, I think there is a general consensus that the Bridgestone RE-71's warm up quickly and work well for Autoslalom but might get greasy after several laps of Time Attack. You'll have to take my observations with a tablespoon of salt, but I didn't notice the RE-71's "going off" after a full day of Time Attack. However, I did notice considerable wear.
  20. If anyone is considering running Bridgestone RE-71R or BF Goodrich Rival S1.5, here's a good head-to-head test specific to Autocross use. Hope the link works (I'm new at this) but if not you can simply Google "Beyond Seat Time". Lots of good autocross information on the site. https://www.beyondseattime.com/bfg-rival-s-1-5-vs-bridgestone-re71r-round-2/
  21. I've checked out Speedworld a few times this month to see what it's like. Great staff - very friendly and helpful. Phil works there Mondays and Wednesdays and was good enough to show me around and give me some pointers. Just in the few times I've gone out, I've progressed from painfully slow to just plain slow. Baby steps. It's unfortunate we didn't get enough club members to form a group, but maybe a few of us could still hook up on a regular basis during March & April for a few laughs. If you're interested, just send me a PM. It is FUN!!!
  22. I'm driving the Focus RS and have been doing Autoslalom for two years and Time Attack for one year. I go through nearly 3 sets of tires per season. I've been on Michelin Pilot Super Sports, Bridgestone RE-71R's (3 sets), Hankook Ventus R-S4, and lastly the General G-Max RS. I'm now looking for something that will last longer. I'm willing to give up grip for longevity. I'm not the smoothest of drivers and am probably contributing to my own tire wear problems. Maybe you just can't teach an old dog new tricks? I'm hoping this post will build a list of tires, with their own pros and cons, that will help newcomers identify what might work best for them. Doesn't make any sense for a newbie (like me) to buy the most sticky and expensive tires if they don't have the skills to reap the benefits. Like I've been told, over and over - first, focus on improving your driving skills before you even think about spending money on modifying the car. Let's see what kind of feedback we get, and I won't be surprised if we uncover some lesser known brands/models that will work just fine.
  23. No, no, not that kind of retire. I'll be back for another season. I meant time to re-tire my car. We're only 42 days and 12 hours from our first Lapping/Autoslalom event on Friday May 3rd, to it's time to check out tires. I was down at Costco today and they are presently offering a $70 credit on Bridgestone tires up until April 14th. I'm trying to find something that will work for both Gimli and St. Andrew's courses. I'm sure there will be a lot of new people at HPDE asking … "what kind of tires should I run?" I think the Autoslalom guys still go with the Bridgestone RE-71R as their tire of choice. Not sure what others would fill the top five. I never did get a chance to talk to the Open Lapping and Time Attack people as to their favourites. I was told the Bridgestone RE-71R's go off after five laps and wear quickly. Maybe some of you can chirp in as to what tires work best on the GMP track and would be in a reasonable price range for newcomers to the sport. Thanks, and hope to see you at our first event!
  24. Hey Mark, I'm relatively new to karting and would probably get stomped by everyone else … but that wouldn't stop me from having fun and getting a chance to socialize with club members. Count me in for any day, any time!.
  25. Hey Ken! As a technical writer for a Publications Department, I can appreciate the amount of work that goes into one of these newsletters. I haven't seen any previous issues, but I must say that the current issue is extremely well done. Do you think we should also mention that the track resurfacing donations can be made electronically on the WSCC homepage? The PayPal or credit card option is nice and even offers monthly payments. That works better for people like me who would rather spread out the payments over several months, rather than a lump sum payment. Again, kudos to you and all the contributors that made the newsletter happen!
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