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Weebly

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Weebly last won the day on October 9

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  1. Hmm, I was kind of wondering about the choice of words on the unedited version. Good catch! Not sure why they call it a "silent" auction. Obviously not the case last year when my better half was yelling at me as to which prize bags I should be putting my tickets into. Not sure why I need kitchenware or a visit to a Spa for a pedicure. Maybe I'm missing something? Seriously though, you're doing a great job organizing the banquet @cboettch
  2. Ditto for me. Great job Ken! I know most people use social media for keeping up on social activities but I would highly recommend putting the Aficionado on your reading list. I enjoyed the article on Autocross Nationals. I love reading articles written with passion ... better than using a pen.
  3. Here's proof that at least one car made it to Minaki.
  4. Hey Rob, Had lots of fun on the Fall Drive yesterday and got a chance to meet some new people. Perfect weather for ducks, so thanks for leading our group of ducklings safely throughout the drive. Looking forward to next year. It would be nice to get some photos that we could use for an upcoming article in the Aficionado.
  5. Devin/Tony, I've been following your Snake Charmer project since day one and can't count the number of times I've said "are you kidding me?" You guys take on the impossible and somehow make it happen. The latest rear suspension swap (putting a 2015 Mustang suspension into a 1972 Celica) seems to defy the laws of physics. But, again, you somehow managed to get it done. Even the little things, as detailed in your last video on the intercooler plumbing, would bring mere mortals to their knees. Snake Charmer is a cool name, but I think you guys should rename this project, or at least the car, to "PERSERVERANCE" PS - never got a chance to talk much on Sunday but would like to get the back story on the Fiesta ST. Seems like it's a dragstrip car that could easily be turned into an autocross beast. Looked like you and Tony we're having a blast.
  6. Don't worry about the brake fluid thread ... it was giving me a headache. I'm learning s-o-o-o much from you guys. Keep it coming!
  7. @donrolandofuriosoThis just in from Wikipedia: "GL-5 is not necessarily backward-compatible in synchro-mesh transmissions which are designed for a GL-4 oil: GL-5 has a lower coefficient of friction due to the higher concentration of EP additives over GL-4, and thus synchros can not engage as effectively." Hope it's not too late to drain and refill with Redline MT90 (which meets API class GL-4).
  8. Hey everyone, time for an update. The conditions were cloudy and cool on the Saturday of Vintage weekend, but I still lost brakes during the third session. I bled the suspect RH caliper and got back most of my braking. Managed to complete fourth session but pedal travel was increasing. Just to be safe I did a four-wheel bleed before heading home. I tried to do an automated ABS bleed procedure with my newly purchased Autel MaxiCheck Pro but was informed by their tech support that it won’t work on my car. Too bad, so sad. RH brake caliper has been ordered and I’m presently sourcing out stainless steel brake hoses. The RBF660 brake fluid has been in my system for 6 weeks, so that will have to be flushed. How often do you guys do a complete flush on the Fuchs 5.1 and the Total 600? I might just consider going back to DOT 4 now that I’ve convinced myself that I don’t have a boiling brake fluid issue.
  9. @white_cross looks like @Rare Snake has raised the bar a notch or two. I watched Dason's runs on Saturday and I don't think "charming" this snake with a flute will work. You'll need to bring a big club to this snake fight. I always cheer for the underdog and I can't wait to see the completion of project "Snake Charmer"
  10. Okay, that's just plain crazy. And here I thought you're supposed to rest your clutch foot on the dead pedal while going down the front straight and take some deep breaths and relax before hitting the brakes for corner one. This is the one part of the lap that I find relaxing. The idea of pumping the brakes with my clutch foot and hoping that I will actually have brakes as I reach the braking markers takes away my relaxation moment and changes it to anxiety. Not sure this is in compliance with my doctor's advice when he said … " you should avoid stress". Cool video clip, though. Thanks.
  11. Actually, the RS uses the rear drive unit clutch plates to transfer more torque to the outside wheel, rather than using the more common brake application method. As far as the front brakes being used for torque vectoring, I don't think that's part of the process, so I wouldn't think that is adding any heat to the brakes. Just curious whether the sponginess you experienced at the track stayed the same after several days of city driving. Strangely enough, my pedal would become firm again after driving three days or so. I guess your original question about whether you need to bleed the brakes after every event, even with RBF 600, is "probably". If I come up with a fix, I'll certainly let you know.
  12. Wow!! You brought up some really good points @donrolandofurioso. I think you hit on a couple of points that might be contributing to my problems. In my last post I said I would update and report on the results of using Motul RBF 660 brake fluid. The afternoon temperatures on Saturday (Event #3) reached 30°C so it was a good day to test for high brake temperatures. However, the same pattern repeated itself … great brakes until the last session of the day. Only this time, a LOT of air got into the system and I had to bail out (pedal went 90% to the floor). Got home and gravity bled right front only. Didn't notice any air coming out of outboard pistons but got a lot of air coming out of inboard pistons. Brake pedal feel came back to almost normal. I'm leaning toward air being drawn into the system (fittings? brake hose?) or maybe migrating from the ABS module. I have a hard time believing that the fresh 660 brake fluid was actually boiling. I didn't feel confident returning to the track on Sunday and have the same problem reoccur, so I called it a day. I like your theory about air hiding inside the ABS unit and just waiting to spring out when the ABS cycles and then do their evil deed. I don't recall, one way or the other, whether I triggered an ABS event on my last session, but it's certainly possible. I went down to Vickar Ford and tried to get an explanation on how they flush the system while cycling the ABS module. Apparently it's a time consuming process where they suction out the old fluid, and then pressure-fill and bleed while activating the ABS system. Something like >$350. My car's in the body shop this week after being rear-ended (obviously not due to me stopping short), so I won't take any action until next week. Probably try one more flush procedure before spending $300 -$400 at the dealership. Thanks again for the great input!
  13. Once again, great job on the current newsletter! Nicely put together. I enjoyed Greg’s article on the 1965 Shelby Daytona. Good to hear that he was able to track it and do well at Mosport.
  14. Thanks for your suggestions guys. I'm going to try one thing at a time and see what difference it makes. The first step I've taken is to flush out all the existing DOT 4 and replace with Motul RBF 660. I used about 750 ml in the process, watching the volume in the catch bottle to ensure the longest line pumped through the most fluid and subsequently pushing through less and less as the lines got shorter. And Matt, you're right, that stuff is ridiculously expensive at almost $100/litre. But, if I get a soft pedal again, I know it won't be because of brake fluid boiling. This highly expensive, highly hygroscopic (absorbs moisture like a sponge) fluid, will therefore need to be flushed out at the end of the season and replaced with DOT 4 until the 2020 season begins. Then repeat the flush/fill process.. I think RBF 660 is probably overkill and might look into Stoptech 600 or something more reasonably priced. If you read through the suggestions in this thread, there seems to be a consensus that boiling shouldn't be happening with a DOT 4 fluid with a dry boiling point of 509°F. So maybe the suggestion of rubber line swelling is the answer. However, the one thing that supports the boiling theory is that that every time this happens (once last year, twice this year) it's never on a cool day or early in the run. It's always been at the end of the day. In other words, it takes several heat cycles to raise the temperature to the boiling point (and it's probably happening only on the front calipers. Front calipers also getting heat soaked by the engine. The PTU on my car is water-cooled (for good reason), and it gets hot as heck on that side of the car when you're in the pits following a run. Maybe I'm boiling fluid on the passenger side inboard pistons only? Another interesting point is that after city driving the car for three days following the event, the brake pedal becomes firm again. Almost like the air bubbles are finding their way back to the reservoir. Not sure how easy it would be for air bubbles to work their way back through the ABS modulator lines and eventually to the reservoir. The other theory is that the tiny air bubbles actually get re-absorbed back into the fluid over a period of time. However, the downside is that this apparently changes the chemistry of the fluid and will lower its boiling point. Not my theory, just something I read on the Internet. Anyways, I'll wait and see what happens at the next Time Attack event this month and report back before I make any further changes.
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